Wednesday, April 4, 2012

Vitamin C Day

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By Diane Forrest, RN

It was in 1984 when I first became introduced to Vitamin C.  I was never much of a fan of vitamins.  When I was younger my mother used to give me these multivitamins, not the good chewable Flintstone vitamins, but these little orange multivitamins from Upjohn.  It tasted like cod liver oil (or what I imagine cod liver oil would taste like) and every morning when she gave one to me, I would make a trip to the bathroom and flush it.  However, when I was away from home, going to college I had started to develop that "you are fixing to get a cold" feeling.  You know the one, scratchy throat, watery eyes, and sniffles.  I was at the home of my future mother in law, who happened to also work part time as a pharmacist assistant, and she gave me some Vitamin C.  She instructed me to take one a day until the cold symptoms passed.  I followed her instructions, and the full blown cold never occurred, and I have been a believer ever since.

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Many sources disprove the benefits of Vitamin C and the common cold, but I have always had positive results when using it.  Vitamin C is also beneficial with other health problems.  Scurvy, a disease caused by the depletion of Vitamin C, has been around for centuries.  In 400 B.C Hippocrates wrote about it.  It mainly affected travelers on the seas, because do to their long voyages; they were not able to transport fruits and vegetables without them spoiling.  Scurvy was not related to vitamin C deficiency until 1932.  Other benefits of Vitamin C include, but are not fully supported, treatment of pneumonia, lowering uric acid levels for the treatment of gout, and decreasing the chance of strokes.

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When I take Vitamin C, I normally take 1000 milligrams in the morning and at night, however consult your doctor for your personal dosage.  Supplements are a good way to monitor your intake; however Vitamin C is found naturally in Citrus fruits, dark green leafy vegetables and even small amounts occurring in meat and dairy.

Plant source
Amount (mg / 100g)
Kakadu plum
1000-5300
Camu Camu
2800
Acerola
1677]
Seabuckthorn
695
Mica Muro
500
Indian gooseberry
445
Rose hip
426
Baobab
400
Chili pepper (green)
244
Guava (common, raw)
228.3
Blackcurrant
200
Red pepper
190
Chili pepper (red)
144
Parsley
130
Kiwifruit
90
Broccoli
90
Loganberry
80
Redcurrant
80
Brussels sprouts
80
Wolfberry (Goji)
73 †
Lychee
70
Persimmon (native, raw)
66.0
Cloudberry
60
Elderberry
60
60
60
50
41
40
Melon, cantaloupe
40
40
31
30
30
30
30
30
30
Cabbage raw green
30
30
28
21
20
Melon, honeydew
20
Tomato, red
13.7
13
Tomato
10
Blueberry
10
Pineapple
10
Pawpaw
10
Grape
10
Apricot
10
Plum
10
Watermelon
10
Banana
9
Carrot
9
Avocado
8
Crabapple
8
Persimmon (Japanese, fresh)
7.5
Onion
7.4
Cherry
7
Peach
7
Apple
6
Asparagus
6
Horned melon
5.3
Beetroot
5
Chokecherry
5
Pear
4
Lettuce
4
Cucumber
3
Eggplant
2
Raisin
2
Fig
2
Bilberry
1
0.3

Today is Vitamin C Day, a great way to start the day is with a nice ice cold glass of orange juice!  It tastes good, and is good for you.

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For more information about Vitamin C, click here: http://www.webmd.com/diet/guide/the-benefits-of-vitamin-c

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