Tuesday, May 3, 2011

International Firefighters Day

International Firefighters Day to honor and support firefighters who risk their lives every day to help their communities.  As many of you know, my son-in-law Darrin is Seattle fireman working on the waterfront. It is a special day that I take pride in recognizing and give my sincere thanks to all the men and women do this job. This is a day to honor and support firefighters who risk their lives every day to help their communities.

May 4th has been recognized in many European countries for centuries as Firefighters Day because of Saint Florian. According to legend, St. Florian was able to save an entire burning village in ancient Rome with just a single bucket of water. Because of this act, St. Florian is known today as the protector of those who come in danger of fire.

This holiday did not spread worldwide though until a tragic wildfire in Australia took the lives of five firefighters on January 4, 1999. Consequently, firefighter JJ Edmondson sent out an email proposing an International Firefighters Day to be recognized throughout the world.

The symbol for International Firefighters Day is a red and blue ribbon. The color red was chosen to stand for fire and blue was chosen to represent water. These colors are also known world-wide to signify emergency services.

International Firefighters Day is a great opportunity to learn about fire prevention and safety. It is also a day to thank the firefighters in your community for all that they do to protect you!

What is a fireman?
He is the guy next door - a man's man with the memory of a little boy. He has never gotten over the excitement of engines and sirens and danger.
He is a guy like you and me with wants and worries and unfulfilled dreams.
Yet he stands taller than most of us.
He is a fireman.
He puts it all on the line when the bell rings.
A fireman is at once the most fortunate and the least fortunate of men.
He is a man who saves lives because he has seen too much death.
He is a gentle man because he has seen the awesome power of violence out of control.
He is responsive to a child's laughter because his arms have held too many small bodies that will never laugh again.
He is a man who appreciates the simple pleasures of life - hot coffee held in numb, unbending fingers - a warm bed for bone and muscle compelled beyond feeling - the camaraderie of brave men - the divine peace and selfless service of a job well done in the name of all men.
He doesn't wear buttons or wave flags or shout obscenities.
When he marches, it is to honor a fallen comrade.
He doesn't preach the brotherhood of man.
He lives it.

Author unknown


The Firefighter's Prayer

This prayer is dedicated to all those who have gone before me and who will follow me in the line

When I am called to duty, God, wherever flames may rage,
Give me the strength to save some life whatever be its age.
Help me embrace a little child before it is too late, or save an
older person from the horror of that fate.
Enable me to be alert and hear the weakest shout, and quickly and efficiently
to put the fire out. I want to fill my calling and to give the best in me,
to guard my every neighbor and protect his property.
And if according to my fate I am to lose my life this day,
Please bless with your protecting hand my family this I pray.

The last alarm

My father was a fireman.
He drove a big red truck
and when he'd go to work each day
he'd say "Mother wish me luck".
Then Dad would not come home again
'til some time the next day.
But the thing that bothered me the most
was the thing’s some folks would say,
"A fireman's life is easy,
he eats and sleeps and plays,
and sometime's he won't fight a fire
for days and days and day's".
When I first heard these words
I was to young to understand
but I knew when people had trouble
Dad was there to lend a hand.
Then my father went to work one day
and he kissed us all goodbye
but little did we realize
that night we all would cry.
My father lost his life that night
when the floor gave way below
and I'd wondered why he'd risked his life
for someone he didn't know.
But now I truly realize
the greatest gift a man can give
is to lay his life upon the line
so that someone else might live.
So as we go from day to day
and we pray to God above
say a prayer for your local Firemen.
He may save the one's you love.

Carved in stone at the National Monument for
Fallen Firefighters Colorado Springs, Co.

A firefighter poem

HE STARES IN THE FACE OF DEATH
WITHOUT A SECOND THOUGHT
TO SAVE THAT ONE SPECIAL LIFE
THAT HE SO BRAVELY SOUGHT
HE HAS WALKED AS CLOSE TO
"HELL ON EARTH"
AS ANY MAN COULD DO
AND HE'S SO PROUD OF THE JOB HE DID
FOR PEOPLE HE NEVER KNEW
HE PUTS HIS LIFE ON THE LINE
EVERYTIME DUTY CALLS
ALWAYS DOING WHAT NEEDS TO DONE
WITHOUT EVEN A PAUSE
HE IS A FIREMAN
WITH OVERWHELMING PRIDE
NEVER AFRAID TO TAKE A CHANCE
WHEN SAVING SOMEONES LIFE
OFTEN HE SAYS
"IT'S MY JOB"
BUT WE REALLY KNOW
THAT HE IS VERY SPECIAL
AND ALWAYS READY TO GO
SO WHEN YOU HEAR THE SIRENS WAIL
OR SEE THE FLASHING LIGHTS
STAND ASIDE AND LOOK WITH PRIDE
HE'S GOING TO SAVE A LIFE.

KLB
I THINK FIREMEN DO NOT GET ENOUGH PRAISE......
LIVE LIFE LIKE THERE'S NO TOMMORROW!!!!

By Kathy Bond


A firefighters Pledge

I promise concern for others.
A willingness to help all those in need.
I promise courage - courage to face an conquer my fears.
Courage to share and endure the ordeal of those who need me.
I promise strength - strength of heart to bear whatever burdens
might be placed upon me.
Strength of body to deliver to safety all those placed within my care.
I promise the wisdom to lead, the compassion to comfort,
and the love to serve unselfishly whenever I am called

Author unknow

C A L L W A I T I N G

I'm laying in the darkness, I cannot fall asleep.
I wonder where my husband is, I wish he'd call or beep.
I saw him leave this morning, the black boots on his feet.
He said he had to run now, and I know he's on the street.
You'll know him when You see him, his truck is very loud.
He has no time to stop now, he doesn't want a crowd.
A caller said "Please hurry!" Come quickly if you will.
A young man with a motorbike is laying very still.
A mother calls in anguish, her child limp and blue.
HURRY! Come, I need you! I don't know what to do.
I hear his key turning, he's coming in the door.
I hear him drop his boots, then footsteps on the floor.
I hear him in the kitchen, I can tell from his walk,
He'll soon come and wake me, and ask if we can talk.
We'll sit out in the moonlight, and listen to the night.
He talks about a shooting, a streetgang in a fight.
A car crash, a drowning, a small child hurt at play.
The things he needs to talk about, the things he did today.
The old, the sick, the injured, some so very small.
He did all he could to help them, he answered every call.
Every day he has a mission, he knows it in his heart.
He does everything he can and always does his part.
If you are sick or injured and you need to reach my Hon,
I can tell you how to reach him, his number is ......911.

A Firefighter's Wife

"Can We Make It On Time"

The pagers go off, calling us out.
The dispatcher gives the address, with a loud shout.
I jump out of bed as fast as I can.
Grab my shoes and my keys as they page us again.
I go out to my truck, plug in the dash light.
Cause somewhere in town is a fire I must fight.
Wipeing the sleep from my eyes, I see a bright glow in the distance.
A policeman yells over the radio "Code 3, I need assistance"
He said there is screaming, coming from inside.
I think to myself, someone is trapped, but alive.
The pain they must feel, I can't imagine the scare.
I see the station up the road, the chief's already there.
I pray to God "Please let us get there in time,
To save an unknown life, Lord if you must, instead take mine."
I speed up a little faster, but still driving safe.
Still praying to God that I won't be too late.
I finally get to the station, put on my turn out gear.
The chief starts the fire engine and yells "We're outta here!"
The sirens sound off, the red strobe are so bright,
I pray once again,"Lord watch over us tonight."
I suit up for action putting on the S.C.B.A.
The chief makes the comment "Boys the Devil wants to play!"
We arrive on scene, not ever thinking one time,
"Why am I doing this?" or "Why do I put my life on the line?"
As we observe the silence and think "this person is dead."
All of a sudden I see the shadow of a small head.
Looking real hard, trying to figure out what it is.
Oh dear Lord, it can't be. It's just a small kid.
Then all of sudden the head moved, "this kid's still alive!"
So I try to reassure her by yelling "Everything's gonna be alright!"
I always said "I'd die if it would save another life."
But never once did i think that it could happen tonight.
I run to the front door, Kick it open and run in.
Praying once more,"God, we can't let the Devil win."
Crawling on the floor, moving slowly toward the crying.
I noticed a strong smell and loud hissing. Oh No! It's a gas line!
I knew I had to hurry so I got up and ran towards the cry
I found that little girl, she could barely open her eyes.
The smoke was thick and very hot and getting ready to flash.
I took off my jacket, wrapped her in it and gave her my air mask.
I heard a firefighter outside say, "The roof's coming down,
if they are getting out alive, they better get out right now."
I grabed the young girl as if she were a football,
tucked her in close and ran to the window.
The chief ran up and took her from my arm
My other one's broken, but at least she is out of the way of harm.
Then I remembered the gas line. So I too climbed out the window.
And sure enough, that gas line did blow.
The explosion knocked me down, but I got right back up on my feet.
Took no more than 3 steps, then I hit my knees.
Through my blurred vision, I watched that little girl,
with her mom and dad all crying, having a face with a smile.
She then walked over to me and grabbed me by the hand.
She said isn a soft sweet voice "Thank you Mr. Fireman."
We put out the fire, got ready to go home one more time.
I helped roll the hoses, thanking God that nobody died.
And thank you Dear Lord for letting us be on time.


written by: Jerry L. Duncan Jr.
East Carroll Parish
Fire Department
Lake Providence, LA


Hymm to the Fallen Heros

Young and aged
volunteer and career,
man and woman
of all races and colors,
you left aching hearts behind

An eternal flame
warms your names
inscribed on cold, lifeless plaques
around this stone cairn
In the hearts you left behind
your memories abide
in undying gratitude

You asked nothing more
You knew the risks,
served without fear
and paid the highest price

You embody a quality
of which many only dream
Your selflessness for others
is now your eternal crown

O fallen comrades,
give us all this quality
that we may more fittingly
prolong your memory

Annonymons
June 1999
National Fallen Firefighter Memorial
Emmittsburg, MD


“Fire, fire, fire, Class A fire in compartment …..” every person aboard ship listens up to that announcement over the 1MC – the sound of danger and how close is it.  Am I responsible for that space?  Do I need to respond?  Every sailor aboard has been to firefighting, damage control, and first aid training.  They exercise these skills frequently so they become second nature – no time to look at books…you got to know that stuff.  These brave men and women also hold a special place in my heart.


No comments:

Post a Comment