Monday, January 16, 2012

National Oatmeal Month



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By Diane Forrest,

I am a firm believer that breakfast is the most important meal of the day.  After your body goes without food for around 12 hours, it needs something to kick start it and get you going for the activities of the day ahead.  During the cold winter months I love to eat a nice steaming bowl of oatmeal.  Not only does it warm your insides, it sticks to your ribs and keeps you energized all morning long.  Oatmeal comes is uncooked oats, and instant.  I used the oats when I bake cookies and the instant for breakfast.  The instant comes in a variety of flavors, and you can even add things to your oatmeal such as fruit and even chocolate chips.  I just add a little butter and brown sugar, but toppings are limited only by your imagination.
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Not only is Oatmeal good to eat, but it is also good for you.  Some of the benefits include:

Oatmeal lowers your cholesterol and reduces risk of heart disease;
  • Oatmeal can help you control your weight;
  • Oatmeal may reduce the risk for type 2 diabetes;
  • Oatmeal may reduce high blood pressure;
  • Oatmeal is full of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants;
  • Oatmeal is good source of protein, complex carbohydrates and iron;
  • Oatmeal may reduce the risk for certain cancers;
  • Rolled oats are 100% natural, nothing else added;
  • Oatmeal is quick and easy to make; and
  • Oatmeal is delicious!


My cousin's husband has been worried about his cholesterol level, and I tell her to fix him oatmeal for breakfast, or give oatmeal bars, even make oatmeal cookies for snacks.  With all the health benefits from oatmeal, who wouldn't want to eat a bowl a day?

Did you know that according to wikapedia:
In the U.S. state of Vermont, oatmeal making has a long tradition originating with the Scottish settlement of the state. While there are variations, most begin with heavy steel cut oats. The oats are soaked overnight in cold water, salt, and maple syrup. Early the next morning, before beginning farm chores the cook will add ground nutmeg, ground cinnamon, and sometimes ground ginger. The pot is placed over heat and cooks for upwards of 90 minutes, being served after the chores with cream, milk, or butter. As most contemporary Vermonters no longer have farm chores, the recipe is simplified to a briefer 10 to 30 minute cooking at a higher heat. Vermont leads the U.S. in per capita consumption of cooked oatmeal cereal.

Not only is oatmeal good for your insides, it also had many benefits for your outsides as well.  Some people mix up a bowl, let it cool a little and apply to their face as a mask for acne.
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People have been using oatmeal to promote healthy, beautiful skin for a long time. It can provide soothing relief from sunburn, poison ivy or other irritations, and is said to heal skin and open pores. In fact, many moisturizers and beauty products on store shelves contain oatmeal for its benefits, sometimes ground up and sometimes in flake form.

Make your own scrub by grinding two tablespoons of oatmeal into a grainy consistency in a blender or food processor. Add one teaspoon baking soda and very small amounts of water until the mixture has the consistency of paste. Spread that on your cleansed and dry face. Leave on for 10 minutes and gently remove with cool water.   You can even take a bath in a fine ground mixture to ease itching and rejuvenate the skin.  Its good for pets too!

So this month, National Oatmeal Month, see how many ways you can use Oatmeal for your benefit!
And let us not forget Cookies
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