Sunday, January 15, 2012

National Strawberry Ice Cream Day

(Google Image) 
By Akindman,

For as long as I can remember (laughing in the background) Ice Cream has been an item on my list of foods most enjoyed – and Strawberry has always top my list of those with fruit.

The three top flavors of ice cream are vanilla, chocolate, and strawberry, respectively. That's why fast food restaurants feature all three flavors of milkshake, and why Neapolitan ice cream is a smart choice for those who can't make up their minds! But this is a day for strawberry to take the spotlight. While it may be cold outside, that can't stop us from observing National Strawberry Ice Cream Day!

(Google Image) 

People can't seem to get enough of this rich, creamy dessert. The average American eats 23.2 quarts of ice cream each year. And did you know that 13% of men and 8% of women admit to licking the bowl clean after eating ice cream?

To this day, it is a mystery where ice cream originated. Many people believe that the first ice cream dish was eaten by Emperor Nero of Rome, though this ice cream recipe was a mixture of snow, nectar, fruit pulp, and honey. Other sources say that Marco Polo brought ice cream back with him to Europe from China. No matter where ice cream originated, it's a delicious treat in any country!
(Google Image) 

Here is a fantastic recipe for homemade strawberry ice cream:

Ingredients
  • 1 pint fresh strawberries, hulled and chopped
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 cup sugar, divided
  • 2 cups heavy whipping cream
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract


Directions:
  1. Combine strawberries, lemon juice, and 1/4 cup sugar in a mixing bowl, set aside in fridge for 1 hour.
  2. In large mixing bowl beat eggs until light and fluffy, about 2 minutes.
  3. Gradually add 3/4 cups sugar, mixing well. Stir in milk and vanilla and mix well.
  4. Add strawberries with juice and mix well.
  5. Gently stir in whipping cream just until combined.
  6. Pour into ice cream maker and follow manufacturer’s instructions.

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