Saturday, June 9, 2012

June is National Rivers Month



(Google Image)
By Terry Orr

A river is a natural watercourse, usually freshwater, flowing towards an ocean, a lake, a sea, or another river. In a few cases, a river simply flows into the ground or dries up completely before reaching another body of water. Small rivers may also be called by several other names, including stream, creek, brook, rivulet, tributary and rill. There are no official definitions for generic terms, such as river, as applied to geographic features, though in some countries or communities a stream may be defined by its size. Many names for small rivers are specific to geographic location; one example is "burn" in Scotland and northeast England. Sometimes a river is said to be larger than a creek, but this is not always the case, because of vagueness in the language. (Wikipedia)

Rivers are part of the hydrological cycle. Water within a river is generally collected from precipitation through a drainage basin from surface runoff and other sources such as groundwater recharge, springs, and the release of stored water in natural ice and snowpacks (e.g., from glaciers). Potamology is the scientific study of rivers. (Wikipedia)

The Mighty Mo (Missouri River)
(Google Image)
Missouri, Kansas, St. Johns, Potomac, and Elizabeth rivers, the Chesapeake Bay, Puget Sound, Caribbean and Mediterranean Seas, and the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans are major water areas I have spent my life near or on.  They are all connected and serve vital resources for life.
Mississippi River
(Google Image) 

10 Dying American Rivers (Via Lynn Hasselberger - on May 15, 2012):

Great Falls on the Potomac River
(Google Image) 


#1: Potomac River (MD, VA, PA, WV, DC)
Threat: Pollution
At risk: Clean water and public health






#2: Green River (WY, UT, CO)
Threat: Water withdrawals
At risk: Recreation opportunities and fish and wildlife habitat

Low Gap Falls on the Chattahoochee River
(Google Image)


#3: Chattahoochee River (GA)
Threat: New dams and reservoirs
At risk: Clean water and healthy fisheries






#4: Missouri River (IA, KS, MN, MO, MT, NE, ND, SD, WY)
Threat: Outdated flood management
At risk: Public safety

(Google Image) 



#5: Hoback River (WY)
Threat: Natural gas development
At stake: Clean water and world-class fish and wildlife





#6: Grand River (OH)
Threat: Natural gas development
At risk: Clean water and public health

#7: South Fork Skykomish River (WA)
Threat: New dam
At risk: Habitat and recreation

#8: Crystal River (CO)
Threat: Dams and water diversions
At risk: Fish, wildlife, and recreation

Coal River
(Google Image) 



#9: Coal River (WV)
Threat: Mountaintop removal coal mining
At risk: Clean water and public health





#10: Kansas River (KS)
Threat: Sand and gravel dredging
At risk: Clean water and community health

Crystal River
(Google Image)


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